Home   •   Inbox   •   Archive   •   Theme Credit
April 2014
19
Via   •   Source
completely-dunn:

wifipassworcl:

thepottertardis:

apertures413thdoctor:

pleatedjeans:

via

Ellen what the fuck happened in 1998

ellen degeneres came out in 1997

yeah but ellen what happened in 2014

ellen page came out in 2014

completely-dunn:

wifipassworcl:

thepottertardis:

apertures413thdoctor:

pleatedjeans:

via

Ellen what the fuck happened in 1998

ellen degeneres came out in 1997

yeah but ellen what happened in 2014

ellen page came out in 2014

April 2014
19
Via   •   Source

notamorningbird:

lillian-raven:

hungrylikethewolfie:

cure-krismoth:

pagangirl:

emegustart:

latining:

emegustart:

chenisthebestkitty:

emegustart:

This is supposed to happen the first time Persephone is back to the Underworld….so I went and made a sequel for a comic that hasn’t even happened yet. Wibbly wobbly timey wimey….

Did I regret anything? No. No I don’t. 

on deviantart

._.

He kidnapped her

Against her will

Thanks fo her father after her father raped her

She starved herself to get out of his place

twhere do people read romance into this, where??ßß1ßewkofp *flops over*

Thanks for continue to focus on the kidnapping part which is not the point of this myth. 

Life and Death, the balance between them and the changes they cause, and the origin and meaning of the seasons cycle, on the other hand, are the real points. 

Thanks for also persisting in the idea of Persephone as a passive figure. Kidnapped, raped, silenced, with no saying or power over anything (except for maybe starved herself because there are so many different versions of this myth that it’s difficult to keep track of them, did you know that apparently there is a version where she and Hades plot together?)

Thanks for also forgetting that she’s a goddess on her own and becomes Queen and Hades’ equal and actually they’re most stable marriages in the myths. 

Thank you, you’ve enriched this post by telling me things I already know but I don’t care about. (◡‿◡✿)

Reblogging for the bitchin’ commentary and also to add that if anyone wants to read the most current (and IMO accurate) studies on Greek mythology and women’s lives, Women in Greek Myth by Dr. Mary Lefkowitz is invaluable (and incredibly inexpensive for an academic book).

The confusion comes from “Zeus” which is almost a title for a supreme god (think of the way “Caesar” was used). So you have Heavenly Zeus and Infernal Zeus, and they are not the same god but rather the supreme ruler of the sky and underworld, respectively. Likewise Persephone became known as “Infernal Hera” and this naming scheme persisted well into the Roman Empire, where Pluto and Proserpina are referred to as “Infernal Juno” and “Jupiter of Dis” in Book 6 of the Aeneid as well as on many grave monuments and in spells.

Moreover, gods don’t need to eat. Persephone refusing to eat was her refusing to become a part of the Underworld, not her attempting to starve herself. The gods are defined as being deathless, and in Ancient Greek “deathless” is synonymous with “god”. (Cf. Theogony, Works and Days, any of the Homeric Hymns, etc.) The Homeric Hymn to Demeter is really clear about this. (HH 2 370-4, 393-403.)

The marriage of Persephone and Hades is actually the most loving and consensual union among the Olympian deities. Hades first offers a dowry designed specifically to please Persephone (HH 2 10-14.), then carries her off and keeps her as a guest of honour in his house. (HH 2 341-345) Persephone is referred to as αἰδοίῃ παρακοίτι - his reverent wife. “Reverent” here refers to a respect for one’s duty, and the similarity between the pronunciation of αἰδοῖος an “Hades” is deliberate and intended to show how well-matched they are. Persephone misses her mother, yes, but is not overly upset about her marriage to Hades. Even Anchises expresses more regret over his union with Aphrodite. (HH 5 185-190.) Finally, as a proper parent, Demeter is rewarded for giving up her daughter, and offers a gift to the other gods in turn. (HH 2 441-495.)

It is worth noting that Demeter is given a position of remarkable power in this myth and is in many ways treated as or better than a father would be. The focus of the hymn remains the relationship between mother and daughter, and emphasises that it is a bond that can endure even after a woman leaves to marry. More importantly, the Homeric Hymn to Demeter is an etiological myth for the Thesmophoria and the Eleusinian Mysteries, a woman-only festival and the most enduring mystery cult of the ancient world. HH 2 serves to anchor women firmly in religious and family life and sets some fairly idealised standards for husbands. Many issues arise when attempting to interpret this myth into a modern context, which is why it is so important to understand that the myth was created over three thousand years ago and is largely a historical document reflecting the mores of the time.

This is the last time I’m reblogging this strip. I edited the original post because I’m really tired of this discussion, but latining’s comment is just perfect and flawless and really educating and everyone interested in this myth should read it. 

THIS IS FUCKING BEAUTIFUL AND IM SO GLAD THAT MY BOYFRIEND REBLOGGED IT FOR ME TO SEE AND TO READ THE COMMENTS OMFG

Also like to point out that Hades and Persephone were one of, if not the, most faithful divine couples in Greek mythology. 

Compare that to Zeus, who slept with anything that moved.

This comic is beautiful and adorable, and the commentary is (if you’ll pardon the pun) divine.  A++, FAVORITE MYTHOLOGICAL COUPLE, WOULD FALL IN LOVE WITH THEM AGAIN.

Beautiful commentary. God, I love mythology. 

#YES!!   #mythology   #feminism   
April 2014
19
Via   •   Source

doctorbacon:

couple-of-dumbasses:

leviisacutelittleshit:

colourfulpantsandarainbowhat:

beggars-opera:

colourfulpantsandarainbowhat:

WHY DO PEOPLE CALL IT FUCK, MARRY, KILL WHEN THEY COULD CALL IT BED, WED, BEHEAD

easy there henry

whos henry what thef uck?

*faint laughter from Britian*

*history teachers crying*

Omfg.

April 2014
19
Via   •   Source
smashsurvey:


For two days, we surveyed the fan presence for the narrative podcast Welcome to Night Vale here on tumblr. Commonplace Books’ horror/mystery series follows the broadcasts of Cecil Palmer, a radio host in the town of Night Vale. Cecil’s dynamic with his boyfriend Carlos is a frequent feature on the show and has been a point of contention with homophobic bloggers on the site before, but now it seems WTNV’s diverse cast and progressive stance has attracted a new kind of scumbag attitude. 

So, is the WTNV fandom community racist? 
We asked the tags if they thought the community that formed around Night Vale had turned unwelcoming towards people of color and interpretations of figures on the show as characters of color — and, specifically, if they’d seen accepted white supremacist and overtly racist attitudes in what should be safe fan spaces. For a show as progressive and accepting as Night Vale is, the results were upsetting. 
Read More

smashsurvey:

For two days, we surveyed the fan presence for the narrative podcast Welcome to Night Vale here on tumblr. Commonplace Books’ horror/mystery series follows the broadcasts of Cecil Palmer, a radio host in the town of Night Vale. Cecil’s dynamic with his boyfriend Carlos is a frequent feature on the show and has been a point of contention with homophobic bloggers on the site before, but now it seems WTNV’s diverse cast and progressive stance has attracted a new kind of scumbag attitude. 

image

So, is the WTNV fandom community racist? 

We asked the tags if they thought the community that formed around Night Vale had turned unwelcoming towards people of color and interpretations of figures on the show as characters of color — and, specifically, if they’d seen accepted white supremacist and overtly racist attitudes in what should be safe fan spaces. For a show as progressive and accepting as Night Vale is, the results were upsetting. 

Read More

#wtnv   #important   #racism   
April 2014
19
Via   •   Source

Years and years ago, there was a production of The Tempest, out of doors, at an Oxford college on a lawn, which was the stage, and the lawn went back towards the lake in the grounds of the college, and the play began in natural light. But as it developed, and as it became time for Ariel to say his farewell to the world of The Tempest, the evening had started to close in and there was some artificial lighting coming on. And as Ariel uttered his last speech, he turned and he ran across the grass, and he got to the edge of the lake and he just kept running across the top of the water — the producer having thoughtfully provided a kind of walkway an inch beneath the water. And you could see and you could hear the plish, plash as he ran away from you across the top of the lake, until the gloom enveloped him and he disappeared from your view.

And as he did so, from the further shore, a firework rocket was ignited, and it went whoosh into the air, and high up there it burst into lots of sparks, and all the sparks went out, and he had gone.

When you look up the stage directions, it says, ‘Exit Ariel.’

 - Tom Stoppard, University of Pennsylvania, 1996 (via flameintobeing)
April 2014
18
Via   •   Source

lost-in-pink:

Nothing turns on a girl more than good fight choreography.

April 2014
18
Via   •   Source

I had a patient in the clinic who really did not want an abortion but who had no resources to cover the costs of prenatal care or childbirth. She was single and without insurance coverage but made just enough money to be ineligible for state assistance. She already had outstanding bills at the hospital and with the local ob-gyn practice. No doctor would see her without payment up front.

We were willing to do the abortion for a reduced rate or for free if necessary. But she really didn’t want an abortion. Once I understood her situation, I went to the phone and called the local ‘crisis pregnancy center.’

"Hello, this is Dr. Wicklund."

Dead silence. I might as well have said I was Satan.

"Hello?" I said again. "This is Dr. Wicklund."

"Hello," very tentatively, followed by another long silence.

"I need help with a patient," I said. She came to me for an abortion, but really doesn’t want one. What she really needs is someone to do her prenatal care and birth for free."

"What do you expect us to do?"

I let that hang for a minute.

 -

This Common Secret, Susan Wicklund

Crisis Pregnancy Centers often disguise themselves as medical facilities, with advertisements offering “help” with an unplanned pregnancy. Their main goal is to keep the pregnant person from having an abortion at all costs. Usually, all they’ll give you is a free pregnancy test, some baby clothes, and maybe a box of diapers.

The patient referred to in the quote was given free prenatal care and did not have to pay the financial cost of childbirth by a local anti-choice doctor. She would often stop by Dr. Wicklund’s office to let her know how she was doing:

"He always moans and groans about being tricked into [doing this]," she says. "Then he goes off on these tirades against abortion."

(via provoice)

April 2014
16
Via   •   Source

viktormayrin:

[SCREAMING]

LOOK.

LOOK AT THE NEW COVERS FOR SABRIEL AND LIRAEL.

SOURCE AND SOURCE, MOTHERFUCKERS. WEEP IN AWE.

rwbwby you really have to read these books.

Edit: Added the Abhorsen cover. Source.

April 2014
16
Via   •   Source

kitsunecoffee:

THIS IS THE GREATEST THING EVER

April 2014
16
Via   •   Source
acepalindrome:

robotwithhumanhairpt50:

notmysecret:

i…

Fuck

Actually, ‘fall’ has its origins as an Anglo-Saxon word, and was popularized for use to denote the season around the 16th century from the poetic term ‘the fall of leaf.’ In the language that would develop after 1066, words that were coded as being common or lowly generally had Anglo-Saxon roots while the ‘educated’ words of the elite had French and Latin roots. This is why, even in modern English, we use ‘cow,’ which has an Anglo-Saxon origin, for the animal out in the field and ‘beef,’ which has a French origin, for the food to be consumed. The poor handle the animal while the rich eat the meat, and that is reflected in the language. The language of the conquerors was elevated while the language of the conquered was made base and common. If ‘autumn’ sounds smarter than ‘fall,’ that is only the linguistic snobbery of history talking.

acepalindrome:

robotwithhumanhairpt50:

notmysecret:

i…

Fuck

Actually, ‘fall’ has its origins as an Anglo-Saxon word, and was popularized for use to denote the season around the 16th century from the poetic term ‘the fall of leaf.’ In the language that would develop after 1066, words that were coded as being common or lowly generally had Anglo-Saxon roots while the ‘educated’ words of the elite had French and Latin roots. This is why, even in modern English, we use ‘cow,’ which has an Anglo-Saxon origin, for the animal out in the field and ‘beef,’ which has a French origin, for the food to be consumed. The poor handle the animal while the rich eat the meat, and that is reflected in the language. The language of the conquerors was elevated while the language of the conquered was made base and common. If ‘autumn’ sounds smarter than ‘fall,’ that is only the linguistic snobbery of history talking.